Option Courses

This roster of Urban Studies option courses is based on the most current information the program is able to gather from affiliated departments and faculties. Every effort is made to ensure accuracy, but this process is not unerring. For further information about courses — for example, concerning grading method, reading or other data not provided here — please consult the relevant department or faculty calendar or website.

(For further information about Department of Social Science courses please consult the Department calendar or website)
Please note that courses marked with an asterisk [*] may not be offered in 2017-2018

Department of Anthropology

AP/ANTH 3020 6.0 RACE RACISM AND POPULAR CULTURE
Course Director: TBA

This course critically explores ideas of race and racist practice, both past and present. Through a range of readings and audiovisual materials, we will examine how race is produced and reproduced, as well as how racism is perpetuated and sustained, in multiple, shifting, and context-dependent ways. Of particular concern will be the ways in which various forms of popular culture are shaped by, and shape, race and racism.

The course will also look at how race and racism intersect with, and in, the production of other identity categories and experiences, including gender, nation, class, ethnicity and sexuality. A range of explanatory models and approaches will be examined from political economy and historical materialism, to discourse theory and performance theory.

Format: Two seminar hours and one tutorial hour weekly
Projected Enrollment: 50

AP/ANTH 4450 3.0 (W) THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE CITY
Course Director: TBA

As a massive assemblage of humans and non-humans, the city poses an interesting set of theoretical and methodological challenges for anthropology. Through a critical reading of ethnographic case studies from Brazil, China, India, and Canada, the course introduces the students to the theoretical concepts and methodological tools used by anthropologists and covers topics such as urban segregation, informality, poverty, im/migration, planning, renewal, and dissent.

Course Credit Exclusions: None.
Format: Two seminar hours and one tutorial hour weekly
Projected Enrollment: 25

Department of Economics

AP/ECON 3230 3.0 (F) URBAN ECONOMICS
Course Director: TBA

This course examines the economic performance of urban areas and applies economic theory to study contemporary metropolitan problems such as poverty and welfare, housing and land, transportation and traffic, and pollution and the urban environment. Considers theories of location to understand the existence and location of cities and the spatial distribution of alternative activities within cities.

Prerequisite: AP/ECON 1000 3.0 or equivalent
Course credit exclusion: GL/ECON 3320 3.00
Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 100

AP/ECON 4279 3.0 (W) HOUSING ECONOMICS
Course Director: TBA

This course examines housing markets and housing policy. Introduces models of demand, supply, and housing market equilibrium emphasizing the special characteristics of housing. Uses welfare economics to study the design of optimal policies.

Prerequisite: AP/ECON 2300 3.00 and AP/ECON 2350 3.00 or equivalent
Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 50

Department of English

AP/EN 3592 6.0 (SUMMER) LITERARY LONDON
Course Director: TBA

London has been an inspiration, both negative and positive, for generations of British writers. This course, taught in the classroom at York and in London itself, investigates how an understanding of the many facets of the city can transform our understanding of its literature. Readings will address the abundant variety of experiences London has offered and still offers its writers.

Prerequisite: None
Course credit exclusions: None

AP/EN 4003 6.0 URBAN EXPERIENCE IN VICTORIAN BRITAIN
Course Director: TBA

This course examines the new narratives of urban existence in 19th century Britain, with emphasis on class, gender, and especially that new-found entity, the crowd, and the responses - outrage, sympathy, voyeurism, revulsion - it inspired.

Course credit exclusions: None.
Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 22

AP/EN 4073 6.0 THE SMALL TOWN IN FILM AND LITERATURE
Course Director: TBA

This course examines representations of the rural community in literature and film from the golden age of classical Greek myth to the contemporary gated suburb. Particular attention is paid to the strategies of narrative and fantasy underpinning such representations.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/EN 3755 6.00
Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 22

AP/EN 4165 6.0 CITY TEXTS AND TEXTUAL CITIES
Course Director: TBA

This course focuses on the complex project of writing the city, in Anglo-American literature, from the 1840s to the late 1930s. The primary concern is prose fiction and poetry, but the works or visual artists, architects, and social scientists will be considered.

Course credit exclusions: None
Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 22

Department of Geography

AP/GEOG 2220 6.0 URBAN GEOGRAPHY
Course Director: Ulrich Best

In a world where over 50 percent of the population lives in urban areas, cities play a significant role in shaping the social, cultural, economic, political, and environmental conditions of people's everyday lives. This course introduces the geographical literature on the urbanization process in historical and contemporary perspective. It provides students with a necessary general survey of the characteristics of urban processes and patterns, urban systems and structure, and urban social issues from a geographical perspective.

Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 90

*AP/GEOG 2300 6.0 SOCIAL GEOGRAPHY
(not offered in 2015-16)

Social geography is the study of social relations and the spatial structures that underpin those relations. This course examines the spatial patterns of society and the interactions within and among social groupings in their spatial contexts. The course material focuses principally on eight spatial scales - body, home, community and neighborhood, institutions, streets, cities, the rural, and the nation.

The course will explore how social identities (gender, race, class, sexuality, religion) and relations are constructed in and through these spatial scales and how the meanings of these scales are contested and negotiated by their various occupants. Questions of homogeneity and difference, control and disorder, and social inclusion and exclusion run throughout the course.

AP/GEOG 3040 3.0 (F) URBAN ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE
Course Director: Richard Anderson

This course examines how processes of urbanization result in the unequal spatial and social distribution of environmental goods (e.g., pollution, toxic waste, landfills) in North American cities. It investigates the ways in which cities, as dynamic human ecologies in their own right, have increasingly become sites of environmental contestation, and explores the articulation of social justice, urbanization and environmentalism.

Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 60

AP/GEOG 3060 3.0 (F) POST-COLONIAL GEOGRAPHIES
Course Director: Joseph Mensah

This course examines the particular landscapes produced by colonialism and the struggles to move beyond it. Attention is paid to the use of space and place as mechanisms of control and liberation. Examples are international, and concern fictional and non-fictional landscapes.

Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 60

AP/GEOG 3070 6.0 GENDER, POPULATION AND MIGRATION
Course Director: TBA

Characteristics and problems in growth and distribution of human populations, including birth, fertility and death rates, population growth and environment, globalization and migration and population control policies. Gender perspectives are emphasized.

Prerequisite: 54 credits successfully completed. Course credit exclusion: AP/GEOG 4070 6.00 (prior to Fall 2012).

Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 40

AP/GEOG 3080 3.0 (F) READING LANDSCAPES THROUGH TIME
Course Director: TBA

Landscape is a concept fundamental to geography, and this course discusses approaches to landscape through the lens of cultural and historical geography. Since landscape is an ambiguous concept, the course commences with a review of how the word has been used in twentieth-century geographical and historical research as well as how the landscape "way of seeing/observing" has manifested itself in Western societies throughout the modern period.

Material, ideological and symbolic approaches to the study or "reading" of historical landscapes will be explored throughout the course, using case studies for illustration. Topics include the meaning of "landscape" in the early modern period, gentrified landscapes and class relations, colonial and postcolonial landscapes, modernist and post modernist landscapes, literary landscapes, and immigrant ethnic landscapes. The focus is broadly international, drawing upon research in Canada, the United States, England, Ireland, Asia and West Africa.

Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 40

AP/GEOG 3220 3.0 (W) ADVANCED URBAN GEOGRAPHY
Course Director: TBA

This course addresses significant contemporary urban issues that frame geographic understandings of metropolitan change in the twenty-first century. Attention is directed towards understanding how cities are produced, consumed, and theorized as complex social, economic, ecological, and political systems.

Case studies are drawn from Canada and other More Economically Developed and Less Economically Developed countries. Through lectures, discussion, and assignments students are encouraged to challenge geographical interpretations of the urban world, and to think critically about cities as products of capital investment, as collective public goods, and as socio-cultural spaces.

Prerequisite: 54 credits including AP/GEOG 2220 6.00
Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 60

AP/GEOG 3340 3.0 (F) INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS (GIS)
Course Director: TBA

This course is an introduction to the application of GIS to geographical/environmental problems. A broad conceptual overview of GIS approaches their strengths and limitations. Students gain hands-on experience in the use of raster-based GIS technology with particular reference to resource management and planning topics.

Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 60

AP/GEOG 3650 6.0 WIRED CITIES: COMMUNITY, TECHNOLOGY AND CHANGING URBAN PLACES
Course Director: TBA

The course examines the impact of technology on urban form, urban function and community. Emphasis is placed on the social, economic and political parameters of urban infrastructure, community formation and everyday life in the wake of technological change. Students should have some familiarity with using e-mail and browsers and may participate in the course using their home computer or a university computer.

Prerequisite: 24 credits successfully completed or written permission from the Course Director.

Format: Two lecture hours and one tutorial hour, by internet
Projected Enrollment: 90

AP/GEOG 3800 3.0 (W) GEOGRAPHIES OF WORK
Course Director: TBA

This course examines the geographies of productive and reproductive labour at multiple scales, including global, national, regional, urban, domestic and personal.

Prerequisite: 24 credits successfully completed
Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 60

AP/GEOG 3900 3.0 (F) PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHIES OF THE CITY
Course Director: TBA

This course explores the natural and physical systems of the city, focusing on the climate, water, geomorphology, biogeography of the urban landscape, including its built environment.

Course credit exclusions: None
PRIOR TO FALL 2000: Course credit exclusion: AS/GEOG 3900 3.0
Format: three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 60

AP/GEOG 4040 6.0 URBAN HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY
Course Director: TBA

A course which examines the historical geography of cities, particularly those of 19th century North America. The major focus of attention is the role of certain economic and cultural factors in the development of spatial arrangements within and among cities.

Prerequisite: 72 credits successfully completed and one of AP?GEOG 1410 6.0, AP/HIST 2600 6.0
Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 60

AP/GEOG 4090 3.0 (F) URBAN IDENTITIES: HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES ON RACE, ETHNICITY, CLASS & GENDER IN CANADIAN & AMERICAN CITIES
Course Director: TBA

This course considers the historical and spatial construction of racial, ethnic, gender and class identities in the broader context of urban development in Canada and the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Prerequisite: 72 credits successfully completed and one of: AP/GEOG 2220 6.0 or AP/GEOG 4040 6.0 or AP/GEOG 4170 3.0 or AP/GL/WMST 3505 3.0 or AP/SOSC 2710 6.0 or AP/SOSC 3760 6.0 or AP/SOCI 3830 6.0 or AP/SOCI 4055 6.0 or AP/SOCI 4120 6.0, or written permission of the course director.

Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 25

AP/GEOG 4095 3.00 (SUMMER 2015) ABORIGINAL SPACE & THE CITY: NORTH AMERICAN URBANIZATION & ABORIGINAL PEOPLE, 1890-1980
Course Director: TBA

The interdisciplinary course explores the historical construction of Aboriginal space in Canada and US, and its relationship to cities. It does so as a cross-border study, examining this process in both Canada and the US, thereby viewing the border as part of this colonial mapping of space in North America. Canada and the United States are predominantly urban nations, and have been since the early part of the century. In contrast, Aboriginal people have remained predominantly rural, tied to reservation lands. This course explores the way in which this difference was imagined, as well as the impact this spatial arrangement had on Aboriginal economies, politics, and identity. It also draws attention to the various ways in which Aboriginal people have responded to this process. An interdisciplinary course, it draws on Geography, History and Native Studies, among others.

Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 25

AP/GEOG 4130 3.0 (F) PLANNING SUBURBS
Course Director: TBA

From garden suburbs to post-war inner and outer suburbs, from New Urbanist communities to edge cities, technoburbs, and exurbs, this course critically considers the planning of suburban built form and the suburbanization process in historical perspective.

Consideration is given to the mechanisms and the challenges of managing suburban growth, and to the complex socio-cultural geographies and values that shape the suburbs and the suburban way of life. Attention is directed to issues of gender, racialized poverty, unemployment, infrastructural inadequacy, sprawl, and sustainability, and an effort is made to envision alternative futures.

Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 25

AP/GEOG 4170 3.0 (W) GEOGRAPHIC PERSPECTIVES ON IMMIGRATION, ETHNICITY AND RACE IN MODERN CITIES
Course Director: TBA

This course first discusses a number of conceptual issues concerning the residential segregation of ethnic and racial groups. The course then considers several case examples that exemplify the varied experiences of ethnic and racial groups in modern cities.

Prerequisite: 84 credits successfully completed, including AK/GEOG 2500 6.00 or AS/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AS/GEOG 1410 6.00 or written permission of the course director. Third-year Honours students with 78 credits completed who are also taking summer courses may enroll.

Format: Three lectures hours and discussion period weekly
Projected Enrollment: 25

*AP/GEOG 4220 3.0 GEOGRAPHIES OF INDUSTRY
(not offered in 2015-2016)

This course draws on contemporary institutional approaches and theories of regulation to interpret trends in industrial production and location in the current neoliberal age. Emphasis is put on concepts of: restructuring; the evolution of post-Fordist systems of production; new regional and global divisions of labour; neo-artisanal production; the mergence of new industrial spaces; cultural production; resource economies; and the social economy.

AP/GEOG 4240 3.0 (F) THE PLANNING OF URBAN PUBLIC FACILITIES
Course Director: TBA

Theoretical and practical problems concerning the supply and distribution of public goods and services in urban areas.

Prerequisite: AP/GEOG 1000 6.00 or AP/GEOG 1410 6.00 or AP/SOSC 2710 9.00 or written permission of the course director.
Course credit exclusions: None
Format: Three seminar hours and discussion period weekly
Projected Enrollment: 25

*AP/GEOG 4260 3.0 APPLIED TRANSPORTATION GEOGRAPHY
(not offered in 2015-2016)

This course focuses on urban transportation planning and policy analysis as an area of research. It discusses the theoretical principles governing movement and planning, and analytically examines approaches to policy problems.

*AP/GEOG 4280 3.00 IMAGINING TORONTO: LITERARY GEOGRAPHIES OF A CITY
(not offered in 2015-2016)

This course explores intersections of literature and place in the Toronto region, exposing students to critical and imaginative works on place, culture, and representation. Close readings of a wide selection of Toronto-based literature are paired with critical scholarly works interrogating how places are invented, (re)presented, and (re)produced.

*AP/GEOG 4380 3.0 (F) URBAN SOCIAL POLICY
(not offered in 2015-2016)

A critical examination of the links between urban social problems and state policies. The course studies how policy makers, planners and geographers understand and deal with social problems in the contemporary city and evaluates selected planning policies.

AP/GEOG 4605 3.0 (F) THE GREATER TORONTO AREA: A GEOGRAPHICAL PERSPECTIVE
Course Director: TBA

This course examines the processes and issues of urban growth and change in the Greater Toronto Area, including the forces shaping growth, the consequences of growth, and planning initiatives/proposals for managing growth.

Prerequisite: 72 credits successfully completed or permission of the course director.
Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 25

AP/GEOG 4900 3.0 (F) PUBLIC SPACE
Course Director: TBA

This course examines the existence, genealogies, qualities, significance, and use of public space, as well as past and emergent challenges and threats to public space.

Prerequisite: 72 credits successfully completed.
Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 25

Department of History

*AP/HIST 1005 6.0 THE EVOLUTION OF URBAN BLACK AMERICA
(not offered in 2015-2016)

This course focuses on the development of urban black communities in the northern US in relation to the immense changes that took place from 1830 to 1940, especially the complex reasons which lead African Americans to leave the South.

*AP/HIST 1015 6.0 MICHAELANGELO'S ROME, PEPYS'S LONDON
(not offered in 2015-2016)

This course traces two great cities in brilliant eras. It explores family, love, sex, friendship, clientage, the politics of both state and private life, religion, magic, ethics, taste, art and budding science. It also teaches observation, argument, and research techniques.

AP/HIST 3775 3.0 (W) HISTORY OF HONG KONG
Course Director: B. Luk

This course explores the economic, political, social and cultural development of the city state of Hong Kong and its environs, within the context of Chinese and British imperial history, from its 19th century foundations to the present.

Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 50

*AP/HIST 3776 3.0 HISTORY OF SINGAPORE
(not offered in 2015-2016)

This course explores the history of Singapore, primarily in the 19th and 20th centuries. Geographic, political, social and ethnic themes are emphasized, with particular focus on the roles of Malay, Indian and Chinese peoples.

AP/HIST 4131 3.0 THE CITY OF ROME 250 BC - AD 200

This course examines the city of Rome during the period 250 BC - AD 200. Topics include urban space, politics and the monumentalization of the city; living conditions for mass and elite; economic, religious and social life in the city.

*GL/HIST 4244 3.0 URBAN HISTORY
(not offered in 2015-2016)

This course analyzes the field of urban history through the advanced critical study of a city, a metropolis or an urban space. It uses specialized conceptual and methodological approaches and requires individual research projects. Topics will vary each year.

Prerequisite: At least 6 credits in history.

AP/HIST 4530 6.0 THE DEVELOPMENT OF TORONTO
Course Director: S. Kheraj

This course explores the history of Toronto from the earliest times to the present. as the current largest city in Canada, Toronto offers insights into the complicated history of urbanization in North america. Students in this course will explore the history of the city from its Aboriginal origins to its resettlement by European peoples to its subsequent industrial development.

This research seminar will offer the students the opportunity to conduct original primary source research on the history of Toronto and make use of local archives, including the City of Toronto Archives and the Archives of Ontario. This course also involves several field trips throghout the city.

Prerequisites: AP/HIST 2500 6.00 or AP/CDNS 2200 6.00 or AP/SOSC 2710 6.00 or AP/SOSC 2730 6.00 and AP/HIST 3531 6.00 or AP/HIST 3533 6.00 or AP/HIST 3535 6.00 or AP/HIST 3546 6.00 or AP/HIST 3555 6.00 or AP/HIST 3580 6.00 or AP/HIST 3581 6.00 or AP/HIST 3582 6.00 or AP/HIST 3591 6.00 or AP/HIST 3850 6.00 or AP/SOSC 3210 6.00 or AP/SOSC 3745 3.00 or
AP/SOSC 3746 3.00 or AP/SOSC 3760 3.00/6.00 or AP/SOSC 3770 3.0 or AP/SOSC 3791 3.0 or departmental permission.

Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 18

*AP/HIST 4550 6.0 ONTARIO IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY
(not offered in 2015-16)

This course focuses on the Ontario community and influences that shaped its development in the twentieth century. Much attention is devoted to the period from the end of World War II to the present.

Themes and problems examined include the emergence of an Ontario identity, the origins and growth of such institutions as the social welfare and local government structures, gender relationships, provincial politics, federal-provincial relations, immigration and ethnicity, social and class structures, the impact of urbanization and industrialization and the evolution of an economic strategy, and the relationship between businessmen and politicians.

There is a large political history component to the course. To facilitate discussion, the research paper topic must be chosen from the 1960's, except with special permission, as much attention will be paid to the decade in weekly discussions.

*AP/HIST 4770 6.0 THE AFRICAN URBAN PAST
(not offered in 2015-2016)

This course examines Africa's urban past. It first concentrates on precolonial cities as centres of political organization, religious learning, regional and long-distance trade and, thereafter, on urban health, crime, women, crowds, squatters, workers and political movements during the colonial and post-independence eras.

Department of Humanities

AP/HUMA 3605 6.0 IMAGINING THE EUROPEAN CITY
Course Director: TBA

This course examines significant traditions of imaging cities in European literature and film and introduces students to key source material and theories in the European tradition.

Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 30

Department of Political Science

*AP/POLS 3110 3.0 THE PROCESS OF URBAN POLITICS: ISSUES, INSTITUTIONS AND IDEOLOGY
(not offered in 2015-2016)

An examination of the political systems of major metropolitan areas in Canada, including the following topics: the structure and operation of municipal government; the role of cities in national and provincial governments; city elections and parties; and political aspects of urban planning.

*AP/POLS 3410 3.0 GLOBALIZATION, STATE THEORY AND CITY-REGIONS
(not offered in 2015-2016)

This course explores the development of global city-regions in a comparative perspective, including a critical assessment of state restructuring processes and how globalization is anchored in urban politics and the ways in which city-regions constitute sites of global contestation.

AP/POLS 4110 3.0 (S2)CANADIAN URBAN POLICY
Course Director: TBA

This course examines the influence of government policy on the development of cities and the characteristics of urban life. It provides a historical, institutional and theoretical framework for understanding and analyzing Canadian urban policy-making and policy implementation. AP/POLS 4110 3.00 is based on AS/POLS 4110 3.00 (O), AS/SOSC 4720 3.00 (X).

Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 25

Department of Psychology

HH/PSYC 3450 3.0 (F) ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY
Course Director:TBA

A survey of issues and research findings in environmental psychology. Topics emphasize the effects of the physical settings created by humans on behaviour and draw material from research in personal space, territoriality, privacy and small-group ecology.

Prerequisite: AK/AS/HH/SC/PSYC 1010 6.0 with a minimum C grade
Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 150

*HH/PSYC 4090 6.0 URBAN PSYCHOLOGY
(not offered in 2015-2016)

This course is an advanced seminar in environmental psychology featuring a research component to train students to perform field research dealing with environmental concerns. The course is intended to provide a more detailed and specialized coverage of topics in environmental psychology. Themes to be covered consist of models of urbanism, urban design, psychological aspects of housing, transportation management, driving behaviour, urban stress, environmental criminology, cognitive mapping and quality-of-life issues in urban areas. Students will receive training in research methodology prior to undertaking field research. Students are advised to check with the Department of Psychology to obtain the most recent course description.

Department of Social Science

*AP/SOSC 1731 9.0 (Internet Course)
CYBERCITIES: COMMUNITY AND COMMUNICATION IN CHANGING URBAN AREAS

Technology’s impact on cities is examined, with an emphasis on institutions and landscapes. Changes of metropolitan form, issues of community formation, and emerging patterns of work, leisure and urban life are explored in the context of shifting modes of electronic communication. Sections of the course include: urban infrastructure and technology; the city as a communications nexus; the changing role of urban institutions; changing spatial organization and urban form; there goes the neighbourhood! (community and neighbourhood formation in the information age); effects on individuals at work, school, play and home and in respect to privacy and access to information; the politics of technology (what is happening to national boundaries?); what’s next? (speculations about the future of cities). Students must be familiar with the use of browsers (e.g. Netscape or Internet Explorer) and e-mail. Registered students must activate their York University e-mail accounts before the start of class.
(Please note that only 6 credits from this course count toward Urban Studies Program credits; these 6 and the remaining 3 credits may also count as general-education requirement credits.)

*AP/SOSC 1732 6.0 (Internet Course) THE CULTURE OF CITIES

From Ur in 3000 BCE to the colonnades of the Greek agora, from Roman baths to the cathedral towns of Medieval Europe, from the squalid industrial cities of Victorian England to the post-industrial cities of today, the city has remained an enduring symbol of human culture. Throughout this course we will be exploring the culture of cities over the last five millennia using a variety of visual images, videos, case studies of world cities and a classic text – The City in History – written by Lewis Mumford, one of the most important twentieth-century scholars in the study of cities.

Online Format. This course is delivered through the Internet. There are no face-to-face meetings. Instead of coming to the York University campus for lectures and tutorials, you will access online lectures, online videos and other materials from wherever you have internet access. Quizzes and assignments will be submitted online. You will use the Internet to connect with tutorial classmates and to discuss course materials with the Course Director and your Teaching Assistant.

AP/SOSC 3711 3.0 (F) THEORY AND PRACTICE OF URBAN PLANNING I: IDEAS AND THEMES

Course Director: TBA

This course provides a general introduction to planning theory and practice. Specific emphasis will be placed on the rationale for planning, the history of planning and theoretical aspects of the planning process.

Course Credit Exclusion: Prior to Fall 2016 AP/SOSC 3700 6.0
Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 35

AP/SOSC 3712 3.0 (W) THEORY AND PRACTICE OF URBAN PLANNING I: PLANNING WORKSHOP

Course Director: TBA

This course provides a general introduction to planning practice. Specific emphasis will be placed on technical aspects of planning including planning regulations, site analysis and problem resolution.

Course Credit Exclusion: Prior to Fall 2016 AP/SOSC 3700 6.0
Prerequisite: AP/SOSC 3711 3.0
Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 35

AP/SOSC 3714 3.0 (F) CITIES AND CLIMATE CHANGE

Course Director: TBA

Cities face many challenges, but climate change presents some of the most urgent demands on governance, policy, and planning that cities have ever experienced. Inequalities are heightened in crises and are often determinative of success or failure in survival. We examine the concept of resilience which is much-touted in academic and popular literature as the desired goal of urban climate policy, consider the issue of urban social justice, and critique how cities can and do pursue resilience in a context of climate uncertainty. The course presents and discusses a range of concepts, theories, and issues relevant to and important to understanding the challenge of climate change for cities. We explore how cities are responding to climate change impacts and forecasts, and how urban scholars assess these responses. We discuss the varied and competing ideas of resilience as a response to climate change and their varied frameworks for assessing and developing resilience. We consider social justice issues inherent in climate change, and review governance and policy approaches. Students in the course address real-world problems through research and prepare dossiers on assigned cities, working in groups, and present their work-in-progress for class discussion and feedback. The city dossiers include a background report on the city’s climate scenario, an assessment of existing climate-related policies, a summary of key urban climate resilience issues, and propose a climate resilience development strategy tailored to the city.

Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 35

 

 

AP/SOSC 3715 3.0 (W) THE URBAN PROFESSIONAL

Course Director: L. Peake

This course focuses on professional development with emphasis on professionalism, networking, ethical awareness, work-life balance and broadening the students’ skillset to make an effective transition from academia to a career in the urban field. The course helps students develop both hard skills such as technical writing and soft skills such as communication, problem solving, and time management. The course provides students a general overview of key aspects of the urban professional’s work such as ethics, keeping up with the literature, evidence-based policy making, etc. Classes consist of a blend of seminars, workshops, and in-class training sessions that provide students the opportunity to gain more hands-on skills to complement their academic knowledge and training in producing research and analytical papers. The course not only prepares students for the fourth-year experiential placement course in the program, but also gives students a head start in choosing a career path upon graduation. Students have the opportunity to explore future career paths in the urban field and the different roles of the urban professional between the public, private, or non-profit sectors. The course seeks to develop students’ ability to effectively network, search, apply, and interview for jobs, and build their professional skills to strengthen their resumes and improve their employability prospects. Students in the course benefit from a range of teaching expertise and skills from faculty and practitioners, including alumnae of the program. Assignments in the course consist of written and experiential exercises to facilitate students’ professional development combining skills training and networking strategies.

Format: Three seminar hours weekly, workshops, in-class training sessions
Projected Enrollment: 35

AP/SOSC 3717 3.0 (F) URBAN TRANSPORTATION: AN INTRODUCTION TO CRITICAL ISSUES

Course Director: D. Young

Transportation issues are often at the forefront of urban political battles as different groups in society vie to have their mobility needs satisfied. Drawing on case studies from around the world, this course considers the links between urban transportation and the quality of everyday life, and the essential role of transportation in urban economic processes. The course explores the uneven provision of, and access to, systems of urban transportation building on the work of Graham and Marvin (2001) and what they call “splintering urbanism.” They document how, in an age of neoliberal urbanization, urban regions ‘splinter’ into highly networked spaces connected by premium transport infrastructure and other zones of poorly connected spaces. Topics in the course are intended to provide students with an introduction to a critical and interdisciplinary understanding of issues in urban transportation. They may include mobility and everyday life, transportation equity and social justice, public vs private modes of transportation, gender and mobility, urban built form and public health, active modes of transportation, transportation and the price of housing, and the transportation needs of urban economies. An off-campus session of the course is organized as a tour of a Toronto neighbourhood chosen to demonstrate the complexity of urban transportation issues.

Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 35

AP/SOSC 3718 3.0 (W) INTRODUCTION TO URBAN DESIGN

Course Director: D. Young

The course explores Urban Design as the intentional shaping of urban space. It questions the assumption that Urban Design is a purely aesthetic exercise and considers it instead to be a realm of city-building that is always political, social, cultural, economic and environmental. Urban Design is explored as a process that intentionally represents cultural values and social organization and that bridges architecture, urban planning and landscape architecture. The politics of Urban Design are explored by posing the question who designs for whom?

Topics may include a historical review of key periods of urban design in the 20th century, urban design and post-suburbia, urban design and sustainability, socialist and post-socialist cities, and the challenges of living in the 21st century with the legacies of 20th century urban design. Case studies from urban regions around the world are critically examined.

Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 35

AP/SOSC 3720 3.0 (W) CITIES AND FILM

Course Director: TBA

This course analyzes representations of the city and urban social life in cinema. Students critically examine the ways in which filmmakers use urban landscapes to convey ideas about city life, urban histories, and urban futures. Prerequisite: None. Course credit exclusions: AP/SOSC 4730 3.00.

Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 35

*AP/SOSC 3730 6.0 / AP/GEOG 3730 6.0 COMPARATIVE URBAN DEVELOPMENT: POSTCOLONIAL URBANISM

This course explores the social and spatial fabrics of former colonial cities such as Jakarta, Sao Paulo, and Morocco. The shaping and experience of postcolonial cities is addressed through issues such as colonialism, nationalism, migration, and globalization. Class time emphasizes discussion; materials include readings and films. Students enrolled in the course as an area-studies program option are required to do their major project within the area of specialization of their program.

*AP/SOSC 3735 3.0 ASIAN CITIES IN CONTEXT

The course considers themes in postcolonial urbanism with reference to a number of East and Southeast Asian cities, including Jakarta, Hong Kong, Taipei, Seoul, Shanghai, and Bangkok, and addresses the primary issues confronting postcolonial cities, with an emphasis on reading the city and examining the experience of urban life. The course begins by outlining some major theoretical issues – including identity, tradition/modernity, nationalism, citizenship, exclusion, and heritage – which underlie the discussion of postcolonial cities and which emphasize the experience of the postcolonial city as a space of encounters, difference, negotiation and visual expression. The class then examines the origins of Asian urban forms and the urban settlements of colonialism and considers the urban architecture of colonialism for the ways in which colonial planners sought to inscribe the power of the metropole in the cities of the colonies. What legacy did this architecture leave for the planners and governors and residents of post-Independence cities? How have the post-Independence planner, governors and residents in their turn attempted to rein-scribe their cities with symbols of their Independence and nationalism? The rest of the course considers these themes arising from postcolonial concerns with the city, including nationalism, migration and globalization. With regard to all of these themes, we discuss their impact on the shaping of the city and the experience of the city, with specific examples from the readings and with reference to films viewed in class.

 

AP/SOSC 3745 3.0 (W) URBAN GOVERNANCE, POLITICS & POLICY

Course Director: TBA

|The course examines urban issues currently in play in Canadian cities. Themes may include forces shaping the postindustrial city, urban planning in the multicultural city, the redevelopment of brownfield sites, gentrification in city downtowns, environmental dilemmas of suburban sprawl, the impacts of immigration on cities, the role of the arts and culture industries in cities today or other topics that are current in the weeks that the course meets. Considerable time is given to small-group and class discussion.

Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment:35

*AP/SOSC 3746 3.0 CITIES AS NEIGHBOURHOODS AND COMMUNITIES

The course considers local areas within urban regions and the people and processes that create and alter them. Different meanings of the concepts “community” and “neighborhood” are explored. Other topics addressed include the relationship between urban planning and local urban areas, designing community, and issues of inclusion and exclusion in urban neighborhoods. Students explore the ideas and issues raised in the course by way of case-study investigations of a variety of Toronto-area neighborhoods.

*AP/SOSC 3755 3.0 HIP HOP AND THE CITY

Explores urban space and urban issues through the lens of hip hop culture. Topics include public space and the arts, race and identity, gender and sexuality, crime and policing, and globalization and the global city. Traces the origins of hip hop in the U.S. while using Toronto as a laboratory to understand the relationship between hip hop and Canadian urbanism.

AP/SOSC 3760 3.0 (F) TORONTO URBAN REGION

Course Director: TBA

The autumn-term course examines the older inner zone of Toronto, focusing on processes of growth and change – in the more distant past, more recently and today – that have led to the urban communities we now find in this part of town. Its main elements are a series of lectures, weekly class discussions and two walks through neighbourhoods in and around the city’s downtown. Each student is responsible for exploring a particular site in or around downtown, reporting back to small class groups about what they are learning about the site and writing a term paper about some feature of the site. The course is oriented to students who are members of the Urban Studies Program and would like to do a close study of inner Toronto and to students from outside the program who would like to try their hand at an urban fieldwork project in a study of the city in which we experience our everyday lives.

Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 35

*AP/SOSC 3770 3.0 / AP/GEOG 3770 3.0 HOUSING POLICY AND INCOME SECURITY POLICIES

It has been often stated that Canadians are among the best housed people in the world. Yet, it is also said that Canada has been in a continuous housing crisis for most of the twentieth century. We will examine this apparent contradiction in the context of the provision and consumption of housing. The course is divided into three major sections. In the first section we provide a contextual framework for policy evaluation by exploring the attributes of housing, housing markets and submarkets, housing need and demand, housing supply and finance, and the justification for government intervention in the housing market. In the second section, housing programs in Canada over the postwar period are surveyed and placed in the context of the evolving welfare state. Emphasis will be given to three major tenures: home ownership, private rental, and social and public housing. Several housing programs will be examined as case studies to see whose interests are served. In the third section we will consider a number of contemporary policy issues, especially concerning households who have difficulty accessing market housing. Examples of the latter include the homeless, women, immigrants and the elderly.

Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 35

 

AP/SOSC 4710 6.0 (Y) URBAN FIELD EXPERIENCE

Course Director: T. Abbruzzese

This course involves students in work with an organization engaged in some aspect of urban development or administration. Students commit one day a week (or the equivalent) to projects defined by a public or private agency in or near Toronto. Each student’s work is supervised by a staff member of the agency and is monitored by the course director. This project should yield a product that both meets the agency’s requirements and is suitable for academic credit. Details of each student’s responsibilities will be arranged before the beginning of the academic year among the three parties involved: the student, the agency supervisor and the course director. Students who wish to enroll in this course must file an application form available from the Urban Studies Program Assistant and a resumé, and will be interviewed by the Urban Studies coordinator. Students must be at the fourth-year honours level. Urban Studies Program majors are given priority.

Prerequisite: Permission of the course director (Starting 2017-18: AP/SOSC 3715 3.0) Format: One day per week (or equivalent) at an off-campus agency and on-campus seminars.
Projected Enrollment: 25

*AP/SOSC 4713 6.0 SEMINAR IN CRITICAL URBAN STUDIES

This course offers students an intensive blend of urban theory and research practice. Students engage with classic and current debates in Urban Studies in a seminar format, and conceptualize, research, and analyze urban sites and phenomena in a workshop format. Classes alternate between seminars in which students discuss key texts in Urban Studies, and workshops in which student's present work-in-progress for peer feedback and critique. Over the year, students select an urban site, phenomena, or set of documentary materials as the subject of an individual research project. A series of sequential assignments leads to a final, analytic paper firmly situated within the Urban Studies literature based upon the student's own research.
This course builds on the programme's 1000, 2000, and 3000 level core courses in which students have been introduced to key concepts and theories in Urban Studies, have been introduced to a range of urban research methodologies, and have conducted their own empirical research. This course is the capstone course for majors in Urban Studies.

Prerequisite: AP/SOSC 3701 and AP/SOSC 3702, and completion of 84 credits, or permission of the instructor.
Course Credit Exclusion: AP/SOSC 4700, AP/SOSC 4735

*AP/SOSC 4735 6.0 SEMINAR IN URBAN THEORY

The Seminar in Urban Theory is another capstone option for the Urban Studies Program. This course studies the development of urban theory from the 19th and into the 21st century. In it, we examine the main theorists in urban studies and analyze how they seek to describe and explain the city, its functions and forms, and the experience of urban life.
Prerequisite: 90 credits completed. Open to Urban Studies, Geography, and FES Students; other students by permission of instructor.

Faculty of Environmental Studies

ES/ENVS 2200 6.0 FOUNDATIONS OF URBAN AND REGIONALENVIRONMENTS: ANALYSIS, PLANNING AND DESIGN
Course Director: TBA

This course focuses on the interrelationships of the ecological, social, built and organizational environments within the urban and regional setting. It provides a critical understanding of urban and regional environments along with a solutions-based approach to addressing urban and regional issues with an explicitly environmental perspective. Students will attain a thorough knowledge of the theories, histories and current issues of urbanization and regionalization and their effect on environments, but also learn practical methods of analysis and intervention in different human settlements. With the Greater Toronto Area as a field laboratory, there will be an emphasis on application and involvement.

Prerequisite: Second year standing or permission of the instructor.
Course credit exclusion: ES/ENVS 2200 3.0
Format: Two lecture hours and one tutorial hour weekly
Projected Enrollment: 150

ES/ENVS 3160 3.0 (W) RACE/RACISM AND ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE
Course Director: TBA

This course examines the intersection of "race"/racism and environmentalism. It begins from the premise that environmental issues are always already racialized. Issues as diverse as toxic facility siting, environmental assessment practices, ecological philosophies, and popular nature representations (re)produce powerful assumptions that turn on racist/racialized constructs. Discussion may include: the history and current practices of environmental justice movements; questions of race and representation in green politics; the significance of environmentalism's silence about race; cross-cultural and anti-racist environmental politics; and postcolonial perspectives on global environmental issues.

Prerequisite: Third or fourth year standing
Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 35

ES/ENVS 3225 3.0 (W) REGIONAL GOVERNANCE
Course Director: TBA

Regional governance includes the government and civic organization of all aspects of life in an (urban) region. This course introduces concepts of the region, regionalism, regional government, and regional economic development. While the course has an international perspective, there will be a strong focus on historical and current regional governance in the Toronto urban region. Particular attention will be paid to issues related to environmental governance, bioregional issues and watershed planning and management.

Prerequisite: Third or fourth year standing, or permission of the instructor. This course builds on ENVS 2200 6.0 which is recommended.
Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 35

ES/ENVS 3226 3.0 (F) PLANNING ENVIRONMENTALLY
Course Director: TBA

This course considers the potential for planning environmentally both within and outside theformal planning processes, and by and planners and non-planners alike. The relationships between planning and environmental issues are explored at different scales ranging from the neighbourhood to the urban region.

Prerequisite: Third or fourth year standing, or permission of the instructor. This course builds on ENVS 2200 6.0 which is recommended.
Format: Three seminar hours weekly.
Projected Enrollment: 50

ES/ENVS 3227 3.0 (W) URBAN PLANNING IN THE GLOBAL SOUTH
Course Director: TBA

This course conceives a conceptual approach to studying urban planning and practice in Third World countries, considering the planning practice's response to the problems and issues in cities of these countries. It also examines the origin and evolution of urban planning practice taking into account the political, social and economical and cultural circumstances of each country. Selected case studies from Asia, Africa and Latin America will be considered for examining and evaluating the urban planning practice.

Prerequisite: Third or fourth year standing, or permission of the instructor. Course Credit
Exclusion: ES/ENVS 3800N 3.0
Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 35

ES/ENVS 3740 3.0 (W) URBAN ECOLOGIES
Course Director: TBA

This course examines the challenges and potentials of incorporating ecological factors in urban environments. Lectures, research, field trips, readings and discussion provide the framework for the interpretation and understanding of natural processes and cultural patterns and practices in the urban landscape. Natural and cultural contexts are examined as a source of design as inspiration and expression. Types of urban environments and design projects will provide a framework of inquiry, criticism and interpretations.

Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 35

ES/ENVS 4161 3.0 (F) SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
Course Director: TBA

This course examines new social movements that have risen in response to the crisis of industrial culture, economic restructuring, shifting political formations and ecological disasters. The course focuses on current theories of social movements, contested issues, and case studies of social movements in action and is intended to provide opportunities for students to gain firsthand experience with social-movement organizations through participatory research projects.

Prerequisite: Fourth year standing, or permission of the instructor
Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 35

ES/ENVS 4210 3.0 (F) GLOBALPOPULATIONS
Course Director: TBA

Examines the trends, causes and consequences in population growth and movements across the globe. It studies the environmental impacts of rises in population, global refugee and immigration patterns and their socio-environmental consequences, and the influence of new immigrants and 'diasporas' on national identity and culture. Case studies explore existing and alternative family planning policies, the enhancement of women's status through educational, health and employment strategies, and immigration and multicultural policies in developed and developing countries.

Prerequisite: Third or fourth year standing and completion of six credits in ES/ENVS, or by permission of the instructor
Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 35

ES/ENVS 4220 3.0 (F) URBANIZATION IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
Course Director: TBA

The key issues of cities in the Third World are addressed, including squatter settlements, rural-urban migration, urban agriculture, housing, urban transport, basic services (water, sanitation, waste management, health and education), urban governance, socio-cultural diversity, and urban environmental planning. Case studies demonstrate public policies and their link to socioeconomic, cultural and environmental issues.

Prerequisite: Third or fourth year standing and completion of six credits in ES/ENVS, or by permission of the instructor
Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 40

ES/ENVS 4223 3.0 (W) GLOBAL CITIES
Course Director: TBA

Large internationalized cities such as Toronto are today tightly embedded within a broad range of global networks-demographic, cultural, economic, ecological, epidemiological-that have major implications for the everyday lives of their inhabitants. These worldwide urban networks and the cities in them are the subject of this course. In particular, through a broad range of interdisciplinary investigations, the sections of this course are intended to explore the origins, characteristics and consequences of this heightened global connectivity among contemporary urban centres.

Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 35

ES/ENVS 4225 3.0 (F) URBAN SUSTAINABILITY I
Course Director: TBA

The course takes a conceptual approach to defining “sustainability” for urban areas, considering patterns of land use, human activities, natural systems and needed rehabilitation. Concepts such as urban ecology, social ecology and the ecological footprint will be discussed. Social sustainability, environmental justice and urban governance are central to the course design. Case studies explore ways of making urban areas more sustainable.

Prerequisite: ES/ENVS 3225 3.0, or by permission of the instructor
Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 50

ES/ENVS 4750 3.0 (F) POLITICAL ECOLOGY OF LANDSCAPE
Course Director: TBA

This course is structured around a critical analysis of historical and theoretical issues related to natural and urban landscapes. The emphasis of this course is on the development and transformation of landscapes as an expression of various social, cultural, physical, economic, political, artistic, technological and ecological forces through space and time.

Prerequisite: Third or fourth year standing and completion of six credits in ES/ENVS, or permission of the instructor
Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 35

ES/ENVS 4800Q 3.0 (F) URBAN DEVELOPMENT PROCESS
Course Director: TBA

The course is a critical investigation of approaches to, and topics in, processes of urban growth, decline, development and redevelopment. Twentieth-century theories of urbanization are examined, and their relevance for understanding selected recent urban problems is studied.

Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 35

Department of Sociology

AP/SOCI 3420 6.0 POPULATION AND SOCIETY
Course Director: TBA

Students will study Canadian population trends and policy debates in comparison to global population issues. Topics may include Canadian and global patterns of population growth; urbanization and urban reversal; fertility, family planning and abortion; famine, disease and mortality; social security and aging; international migration and ethnic composition.

Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 75

AP/SOCI 3430 3.0 (W) ETHNICITY, POWER AND IDENTITY
Course Director: TBA

This course introduces students to contemporary issues in ethnicity, power and identity in international perspective. Sociological and anthropological theories on ethnicity, race, culture and identity form the conceptual basis for this course.

Course credit exclusion: AS/SOCI 3430 6.00, AK/SOCI 3580 6.00, AK/SOSC 3350 6.00
Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 75

AP/SOCI 3450 6.0 SOCIOLOGY OF “RACE” AND RACISM
Course Director: TBA

This course introduces students to contemporary issues in ethnicity, power and identity in international perspective. Sociological and anthropological theories on ethnicity, race, culture and identity form the conceptual basis for this course.

Course credit exclusion: AP/SOCI 3680 6.0, AP/REI 3680 6.0
Prior TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AK/POLS/SOCI/SOSC 3680 6.0, AS/SOCI 3450 6.0
Format: Two lecture hours and one seminar hour weekly
Projected Enrollment: 150

AP/SOCI 3830 6.0 SOCIOLOGY OF URBAN LIFE
Course Director: TBA

An examination of the process of urbanization and its implications for regional rural-urban systems, the city as an information-processing system, and the experience of living in cities. Sub-groups within the city (e.g. neighbourhoods and social networks) and urban institutions will also be analyzed.

Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 50

*AP/SOCI 4055 6.0 EVERYDAY LIFE IN THE METROPOLIS: FIELDWORK STUDIES IN TORONTO
(not offered in 2015-2016)

This ethnographic course explores various features of urban life in Toronto which characterize the metropolis as it appears to diverse categories of its users (multicultural residents, tourists, practitioners of urban occupations, politicians and planners). Students are required to make observations in Metro Toronto.

AP/SOCI 4120 6.0 SOCIAL ORGANIZATION AND URBAN CULTURE
Course Director: TBA

This course examines how urban residents experience and utilize urban environments so as to generate social choices. The ways in which urban planning, architecture and ownership status combine to influence the mix of public and private involvements will be of special interest.

Prerequisite: Students must have successfully completed 84 credits. Course credit exclusions: None.
Format: Three seminar hours weekly
Projected Enrollment: 25

*AP/SOCI 4430 3.0 CANADA AND REFUGEES
(not offered in 2015-2016)

This course offers a comprehensive sociological assessment of some current issues and research in refugee migration. Primary emphasis is on Canada’s refugee policy and responses to it. The unique experiences and adaptation problems of refugee resettlement are examined with particular attention to Third-World refugees in Canada.

German Studies

*GER 3601 3.0 / HUMA 3601 3.0 (W) VIENNA IN THE EARLY 20th CENTURY: LITERATURE, ART, CULTURE AND POLITICS
(not offered in 2015-2016)

A major centre of European modernism, Vienna was home to some of the 20th century's most influential artists and thinkers: Freud, Wittgenstein, Klimt, Schnitzler, Hofmannsthal, Strauss. This course investigates Viennese intellectual and cultural production in this period of socio-political change. Note: Students enrolling in the German (AP/GER) version of this course are required to do the readings and assignments in German. For students enrolling in the Humanities (AP/HUMA) version of this course, all readings and assignments are in English.

School of the Arts, Media, Performance & Design

*FA/VISA 2110 6.0 INTRODUCTION TO WESTERN ARCHITECTURE
(not offered in 2015-2016)

Offers a chronological study of the theory, practice and development of architecture from ancient Greece to the twentieth century, based on the detailed examination of individual buildings.

*FA/VISA 3620D 3.0 THE ARTIST AND THE CITY: 19TH CENTURY
(not offered in 2015-2016)

In the 19th century the rapidly expanding cities of Western Europe came to dominate literature, and they demanded thick series of novels to encompass them. We think of Balzac’s Paris and Dickens‘ London, but these cities have also been seen as the crucible of modernity in art.

*FA/VISA 3710 6.0 MEMORY AND PLACE
(not offered in 2015-2016)

How do places contribute to shaping memory? What is it about objects, art, and architecture, for example, that seem to "capture" memory? Why are certain places meaningful and others less so? This course explores objects and ideas all the while embedded in history to better formulate a notion of the power of place and its relationship to memory.

*FA/VISA 3950 3.0 ASPECTS OF ARCHITECTURE IN THE WEST
(not offered in 2015-2016)

A lecture course intended to outline both the “big” issues of architectural design and iconography as well as the “little” ones at the level of houses and corporate structures in the Western tradition in public space and private design. This course is designed to give maximum coverage to Western architectural phenomena in all areas and to give insight into how social economies and environmental constraints and opportunities conditioned the frame and norms of how people actually lived in cities, political societies, and houses day-to-day. Its intention is to provide a critical view of how decisions about architecture have been reached historically and how these decisions might affect future design norms.

*FA/VISA 4410 3.0 CELLULOID CITY: MEDIA IMAGES OF ARCHITECTURE
(not offered in 2015-2016)

Modernist space, as represented by architecture and the city in photographs, postcards, film and eventually video and digital media, mediate our vision of the city and architecture space. Detailed investigation demonstrates how architecture and the city are intrinsic to visual culture. Specifically, students explore how architecture is represented outside of painting and sculptural space but rather in photography, video and film. Exhibitions, installations, and architectural spaces such as movie-palaces, cafes and bars where films and photography in particular are “exhibited” and frame ideas, is discussed. Photography often fuels our imagination about how we think reality looks and is located. Yet the images we see in movies, videos and pictures are nothing more than constructions and mediations of our visual field and, for the purposes of this course, of three-dimensional places. The course consists of lecture format with digital images, some video and film clips/screenings. An occasional field visit is part of the course.

*FA/VISA 4720G 3.0 TORONTO ARCHITECTURE
(not offered in 2015-2016)

An examination of the theory, structure, form, function and iconography of architecture and urban development in Toronto and vicinity from the early 19th Century to the present. Chronological and thematic approaches are used. Emphasis is placed on architectural-historical methodologies and on skills necessary for original research into specific buildings and architects. Student projects are designed to hone these research skills. Walking tours of Toronto are an integral part of the course.

FA/FILM 4714 3.0 (F) FLÂNERIE IN FILM AND PHOTOGRAPHY
Course Director: TBA

Explores the concept of urban flânerie as expressed through film and photography. The emphasis is on works produced in both Weimar Germany and France.

Course exclusions: FA/FACS 3700 3.0